Ellen de Bruijne Projects at FIAC Salon d’Honneur 24 – 27 October 2013

Ellen de Bruijne Projects proudly presents the following artists at FIAC Salon d’Honneur, booth 1.J06

Kasper Akhøj
Lara Almarcegui
Pauline Boudry/ Renate Lorenz
Jeremiah Day
Klaas Kloosterboer
Falke Pisano
Thomas Rentmeister

 

Kasper Akhøj
Kasper Akhøj & Tamar Guimarães – Captain Gervasio’s Family, 2013 (14 min)
Cinephémère
Tuesday 22 October at 4pm
Thursday 24 October at 1pm
http://www.fiac.com/en/Cinephemere-2013.html

The work of Kasper Akhoj is primarily devoted to a consideration of architecture and design, examining the untold histories of the built environment. Using icons of modernist design – such as Eileen Gray’s Villa E-127 (1929) and the murals added by Le Corbusier against Gray’s wishes, or Danish architect Poul Cadovius’s award-winning 1960s modular display system Abstracta, which was later copied and widely adopted throughout China and Yugoslavia – Akhøj probes not only the complex histories of design, but the ways in which historical narratives are constructed and value is assigned.

Captain Gervasio’s Family’ is a 16mm black and white silent portrait of a Spiritist community in Palmelo, a small town in the interior of Brazil. It’s a town of 2000 inhabitants, half of whom are psychic mediums. The film refers to a map drawn by a Spiritist woman in Palmelo, charting twenty astral cities hovering above the whole of the Brazilian territory. Cities ‘like those on earth, but infinitely more perfect’. The Spiritists in Palmelo practice what is known as ‘the magnetic chain’, a legacy from the German physician Franz Mesmer, the founder of Spiritism Allan Kardec, and the French botanist François Deleuze. The film is a collaboration between the artists Kasper Akhøj (DK) and Tamar Guimaraes (BR).

Lara Almarcegui
The projects by Lara Almarcegui often focus on the mutation of urban and suburban areas over time. This notion of change is central to her artistic practice. She creates a physical understanding of specific locations by meticulously examining spaces that are normally either overlooked or ignored. She renders visible what we otherwise fail to regard, see, register, or even notice. By making the past and possible future of our landscapes visible, her works stand as invitations to leave the exhibition space and reappropriate our environment.

Shown at FIAC by Ellen de Bruijne Projects is a selection of the artist’s projects related to a new publication entitled Ivry Souterrain (Underground Ivry) (2013), an analytical, social and political portrait of what´s currently happening underneath the surface of the department Ivry-sur-Seine. At the moment a lot of changes are taking place underneath this south-eastern suburb of Paris. The borders of the usually invisible territory are changing rapidly under the influence of all the new urban renewal projects that are taking place. With Ivry Souterrain (Underground Ivry) Almarcegui focuses on the current reality that is present underneath the city. Based on a synthesis of current data on the state of the city’s underground areas, her book examines the different periods and below-ground levels of human activity, networks and infrastructures.

Almarcegui´s approach to this project can be considered to be both ecological and political. Besides her analytical art practice Almarcegui emphasises the social consequences of urban planning. Going beyond merely laying out, she turns a critical eye on the notion of progress and the destructive consequences of urban development subjected to financial imperatives. She captures a fleeting moment in the history of this location and places it in a broader timeframe. Questions connected to the environment, the denial of natural spaces, are some of the concerns underlying her artistic commitment. The conquering of the invisible landscape by developers shows that land is surrendered to what is considered to be human progress. The developments are slowly fashioning a new urban landscape and Alcemargui helps us understand what is around us.
Lara Almarcegui is born in Zaragoza, Spain, in 1972. She lives and works in Rotterdam. Recent solo exhibitions include The Spanish Pavilion at the Venice Biennale (2013), Centre d’art contemporain d’Ivry – le Crédac (2013) Musac, León (2013), CA2M, Madrid (2012), Künstlerhaus, Bremen (2012) Secession, Vienna and Ludlow 38, New York (2010). Recent group exhibitions include Manifesta IX, Genk and TRACK, Gent (2012), Radical Nature, Barbican Art Centre London, (2009), Athens biennale (2009), Taipei and Gwuangyu Biennale in 2008

Pauline Boudry/ Renate Lorenz
Pauline Boudry/ Renate Lorenz – To Valerie Solanas and Marilyn Monroe in Recognition of their Desperation, 2013 (18 min)
Cinephémère
Thursday 24 October at 3pm
Friday 25 October at 6pm
http://www.fiac.com/en/Cinephemere-2013.html

Ellen de Bruijne Projects presents a new work by Pauline Boudry/Renate Lorenz: To Valerie Solanas and Marilyn Monroe in Recognition of their Desperation (2013). This newly produced piece is performed by (six) musicians: Rachel Aggs, Peaches, Ginger Brooks Takahashi, Catriona Shaw, Verity Susman, and William Wheeler.
The performers follow the score “To Valerie Solanas and Marilyn Monroe in Recognition of their Desperation”, composed by Pauline Oliveros in 1970. Oliveros said she wrote the piece after reading the radical feminist “Scumbag Manifesto” by Valerie Solanas (who is ultimately best known for shooting Andy Warhol).
Oliveros´ composition asks the performers to choose five pitches each and to play very long tones, modulated or unmodulated. In the middle section of the piece the performers are invited to imitate each other‘s pitches and modulations. The musical piece values the unpredictable and unknowable possibilities that might be activated by not specifying pitches and rhythms. Nothing is known in advance of making the music. Each of the performing musicians plays an equal role, hereby rejecting the hierarchical structures of traditional music. The work poses the question of the possibilities and limits of a politics of musical and filmic forms. Can sounds, rhythms and light produce queer relations? Can they become revolutionary?

The works by Berlin-based Pauline Boudry/ Renate Lorenz (Switzerland, 1972 / Germany, 1963) often revisits practices and materials from the past. Frequently referring to forgotten moments of queerness in history. They combine different forms of media, while simultaneously incorporating materials from historical archives of photography and film. They reflect on the interplay of sexuality, sexual perversions, and photography, as well as their relationship to colonial history of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century’s. Their work produce a mode of ‘speaking backwards’ or a ‘queer archaeology’ and shows embodiments which are not only able to cross different times, but also draw relations between different times Boudry/Lorenz previously made the works Normal Work (2007), N.O. body (2008), Salomania (2009) Charming for the Revolution (2009), Contagious (2010), No Future, No Past (2011) and Toxic (2012). Recent solo shows include Patriarchal Poetry at Badischer Kunstverein (2013), Afershow in CAPC, Bordeaux. Group exhibitions include GOOD GIRLS | memory, desire, power in the National Museum of Contemporary Art in Bucharest. Their work has also been shown at the Palais de Tokyo, Kunsthaus Zürich and the 54th Venice Biennale.

Jeremiah Day
Jeremiah Day – Lowndes County: Prologue, 2008-2013
Performance at Auditorium Grand Palais
Thursday 24 October at 4 PM
http://www.fiac.com/fr/auditorium-grand-palais-conference-2013.html?lg=en

For FIAC 2013 Ellen de Bruijne Projects presents the performance Lowndes County: Prologue (2008-2013) by Jeremiah Day. His projects involve photography, installation and story-telling, and employs intensive research to establish connections between his personal experiences, and places of public and historical significance. Day looks at history through the eyes of the individual and expresses significant events through fractured narratives, employing photography, speech, and improvisational movement.
Mixing important historical and political events and facts, with the more personal and intimate history of the individual, sometimes balancing on the border of fact and fiction. Shifting between the big narrative and the smaller more personal narrative and making an appeal to our imagination. Jeremiah Day is interested in resistance movements, as well as the flux of knowledge, stories and identity through the migration of people and histories.
The performance Lowndes County: Prologue (2008-2013) is the first part of an ongoing project by Day on civil rights organization Lowndes County Freedom Organization in Alabama, which eventually became the first Black Panther Party. The performance reconstructs the early days of the Black Panther Movement in Lowndes County. Starting off with some photographs the artist recounts the historical events and tests their relation to the present. Day wrestles on almost physical way with the historical oblivion and forms Lowndes County as a place full of meanings from, at which local history and global change overlap.

Jeremiah Day (1974) lives and works in both Amsterdam and Berlin. He had solo exhibitions at Arcade, London (UK 2013), Site Sheffield, South Yorkshire (UK 2012), Ellen de Bruijne Projects Amsterdam (NL 2010), Stedelijk Museum Bureau, Amsterdam (NL 2009) and had group exhibitions at Instants Chavirez, Montreuil (FR 2013), Elisa Platteau, Brussels (BE 2013), The 9th Shanghai Biennale, Shanghai (CN 2012), Casa Del Lago, Mexico City (MX 2012), Centre d’art contemporain, Troyes (FR 2010), Ludlow 38, New York City (US 2010).

Klaas Kloosterboer
Klaas Kloosterboer is best known for what seem to be abstract paintings. Colours are applied on the canvas in a variety of ways and the canvas itself can be cut, folded, reshaped or repaired. Almost attacking the canvas and exploring all of its possibilities. Kloosterboer appropriates the visual language of abstract art, but attempts to create more than a formal, esthetic or sensory experience. Kloosterboer´s works are the result of self imposed laws or rather theoretical principles that are a direct result from working in his studio. Conclusions based on repeated experiments and observations made applicable to and expressible by painting. This connection between the act and concept and creating are a very important aspect of Kloosterboers art practice.

“The fact that I subject my paintings and canvasses to certain treatment does not come from dissatisfaction or displeasment. The actions that I perform can be considered rituals that give a certain meaning and significance to life. You stop and think while you are performing the action. By cutting a circle out of a canvas you shape and destroy something at the same time. By taking the part you cut out and sewing it back on the hole you created you are attempting to heal the wound.”

Klaas Kloosterboer had solo exhibitions at Boijmans van Beuningen, Rotterdam, (NL 2013), Ellen de Bruijne Projects, Amsterdam (NL 2013), Kristof de Clercq Gallery, Gent, (BE 2012), Dick de Bruijn, Middelburg, (NL 2010), Villa Romana, Florence (IT 2010) and group exhibitions at Hidde van Seggelen Gallery, Londen (UK 2012), Timmerfabriek, Maastricht (NL 2012), Galerie van Gelder, Amsterdam (NL 2012), Gerhard Hofland Gallery, Amsterdam (NL 2012), Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (NL 2012), Rossi Contemporary, Brussels (BE 2011)

Falke Pisano
Inspired primarily by the act of thinking and the possibilities of constructing and solving problems in the field of language, Falke Pisano uncovers structures, dismantling her subjects to their core construction.
In the exhibited series Pisano has expanded her interests to the field of humor with its unique characteristics. Not only does it provide language with a range of new meanings; humor is also capable of addressing things that are usually not spoken about out loud. With cartoons as her material, Pisano analyses the phenomenon in her own ingenious manner, laying bare its possibilities and imperfections.
In the four collages of Repetition and Dispersion: 4 jokes becoming 5 jokes humor is taken out of its context by literally cutting out the cartoons and phrasing the joke in prose. In the sculpture of the same series, the cartoons are brought together but mixed up differently; Pisano has created a new joke.
Through repetition, (de)contextualization and (re)assembling, Pisano reveals the underlying structure of humor, just like she does in her earlier series Figures of Speech and in her most recent work The Body in Crisis. While in former work she only applied her way of thinking and analyzing to the abstract, she has now shifted her attention to the present world. The shown cartoons have a common ground in their topic of sustenance, former series deal with economics or the body. With this whole new domain to dissect, Pisano is able to stay innovative, presenting us her truly unique way of thinking.

Falke Pisano (Amsterdam, 1978) attended the Art Academy Utrecht and the postgraduate program at the Jan van Eyck Academy Maastricht. Currently she lives and works in Berlin, Germany. She won the Heineken-CA2M award with her latest work The Body in Crisis (Distance, Repetition, and Representation). Recent solo exhibitions include The Showroom, London (2013), The Body in Crisis, De Vleeshal, Middelburg, NL (2012), A Sculpture Turning into a Conversation and other works. Picture This, Bristol, GB (2011), The body in crisis (Distance, Repetition, and Representation), Ellen de Bruijne Projects, Amsterdam, NL (2011). Among her group exhibitions are The Istanbul Biennale (2013), Abstract Possible: The Stockholm Synergies, Tensta Konsthall, Stockholm, SE (2012) Schenkingen van Maurice van Valen, Stedelijk Museum. Amsterdam, NL (2012) For the Blind Man…, ICA London, UK / Museum of Contemporary Art, St. Louis, US/ De Appel, Amsterdam, NL (2010) Rehabilitation, WIELS, Brussels, BE (2010) Modernologies, MACBA, Barcelona, ES (2009).

Thomas Rentmeister
At FIAC Ellen de Bruijne Projects will present a new work by Thomas Rentmeister. The sculpture consists of several methodically ordered and layered refrigerator shelves. A new step in Rentmeister´s systematic reflections on the elementary principles of the sculptural act. These parts of a common household appliance have been combined to form a large block which bares similarities with minimalist sculptures. The additive procedure takes up the seriality of minimalist sculpture and very directly references a basic sculptural principle, according to which a sculpture results from either an accumulation or a subtraction of material. However, where Minimalism insists that the object embodies nothing else other than itself, Rentmeister continuously works with the dialectic between appearance and content, or if you will with a narrative, psychosocial charging of the coldness repertory’s pure art-as-art.
Thomas Rentmeister often makes his sculptures of prefabricated, industrial materials. In his artworks Rentmeister utilizes the materials and marketing concepts of everyday products by removing them from their original context and placing them in a purely formal setting. He hijacks common marketing strategies to achieve his artistic goals, thus contributing to the emancipation of art. What at first seemed monumental, almost sacred, is revealed to be ordinary disposable goods. This irreverence with which Rentmeister combines art and life is one of the most extraordinary aspects of his work.

Thomas Rentmeister had solo exhibitions at the Contemporary Food Lab Berlin, Berlin (DE 2013), Pförtnerhaus c/o FAHRBEREITSCHAFT, Berlin (DE 2013), Städtische Galerie Wolfsburg (cat.), Wolfsburg (DE 2012), Perth Institue of Contemporary Arts, Perth, Australia (cat.), Perth (AU 2012), Kunstmuseum Bonn (cat.), Bonn (DE 2011) and several group exhibitions at Patrick Ebensperger Gallery, Berlin (DE 2013), Kolumba, Cologne (DE 2013), Kunstverein Borken / Stadtmuseum Borken, Borken (DE 2013), Halle 14, Leipzig (DE 2013), National Centre for Contemporary Arts (NCCA), Moscow (cat.), Moscow (2012).

 

 

 

 

 

 

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