Annelise Coste / The Randomroutines – Tibor Gyenis 16/10/04 – 20/11/04

Go to: Dolores


Annelise Coste

New works on paper, sculpture, airbrush installation, poems

P a c i f i q u e m e n t

Réactivons les obliques
Saupoudrons le kilomètre
Déplumons le caporalisme
Grimaçons le stéréotype
Torsadons le savoir-faire
Devançons le téléreportage
Engourdissons l’électrochimie
Descolarisons les ossemnets
Sacrifions la solvabilité
Assoiffons la commerciabilité
Gélatinons la royauté
Méprennons le papier-monnaie
Vaporisons l’indiscernable

Peace Please
No 2008 olympics for China until Tibet is free


Dolores

The Randomroutines

16 October – 20 November

I am a pioneer
It is very good
Maybe I am
It is very nice
The feelings in me
And the fire
Keeps me warm

The Randomroutines show the history of their collaboration.
Budapest based artists Tamás Kaszás and Krisztián Kristóf met 2 years ago and formed the flexible artist group the Randomroutines. In Dolores they bring together their joint projects until now. These collaborations usually start as actions and installations in public space and are continued in the studio where the artists reconstruct their activities into slightly absurdist stories.

The exhibition at Dolores can be seen as a documentation of the public artworks, but forms also a compilation of the narrative reconstructions with the artists in the roles of utopian activists.

Tibor Gyenis (1970, Hungary)

“Tyborman”

Performance at Ellen de Bruijne Projects/Dolores
Friday 19 November 19.00h

“Tyborman” is a superman without supernatural abilities, without fame and popularity among the common people.

On Moscow Square, Budapest, it is the morning rush hour. A man appears to be walking on the wall of the subway station building, defying gravity.
People stop a minute, stare up, guess at what he is doing and why; others take no notice at all and pass on indifferently. Beneath him, in front of the building, the assistant of this art performance Tyborman (referring to spider man) distributes a questionnaire soliciting the opinion and suggestions of the audience.

In his performances as “Tyborman” Tibor Gyenis refers to – but is not identifying himself with – the virile male hero, or with traditional patriarchal values. He is rather fulfilling the criteria that psychoanalyst Theodor Reik, philosopher Gilles Deleuze, and recent writers on performance and visual culture identify for the enactment of masochism or, more precisely, masochistic spectacle.
Gyenis keeps himself in the mode of suspense both literally and metaphorically, for he does not move for 45 minutes. Thus immobile and precarious he stimulates the audience’s anxious fantasy to imagine how his performance will proceed, what could happen next.
He provokes the fears and derision and wonder of his audience, the spectators and passers-by with whom he forges a quasi-contract for the coming day’s events. He wittily plays with the heroic notion of the artist:
The artist as superman, the chosen one, with art’s vaunted ability to prophesise the future, and also with the notion of the eternal work of art (he is a mortal living sculpture) as a monument elevated high above the ground.

quotes from:
Artmargin website: Special Section Focus: Public Art in Hungary
text by Hedvig Turai

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